Race report: Circuit Zolder, 15 June 2021

Nothing unlucky about finishing P13 at Zolder. A strong race in Belgium sees Copper Horse Racing move up two places in the overall standings.

Car 59 had performed well at two practice races held over the weekend at Circuit Zolder – a track opened in 1963 and designed by John Hugenholtz of Suzuka fame – so, on paper, things were looking promising. The challenge would be executing on race day, when emotions can run high. 

Close up: car 59 badged with logos, which include all Secure-CAV partners

Dry conditions for both race and qualification set the scene for some fast track times and close racing, with drivers able to push hard and focus their energy on battling each other on-track. In terms of passing, the main overtaking opportunities are at the first corner and coming into the last chicane – at least according to former DTM driver Robin Frijns

In qualifying, there were plenty of sector highlights for the white and green 2015 Lamborghini Huracan GT3, but some swift laps by the other competitors pushed Copper Horse Racing down to P24 on the timing screen, with nearly the entire field lapping within three seconds of each other. 

Race day  

As we know from previous races, cold tyres and brakes make the first two laps potentially treacherous for all on circuit. However, car 59 dodged any early tangles despite being tapped from behind and, one lap later, oversteering off-circuit when a rear-tyre touched the grass. All wheels back on track, Copper Horse Racing began its march up the order pulling a nice overtake on last week’s winner El Tigre Blanco. However, it wasn’t long before the hot pink Aston Martin V8 Vantage had re-passed – a battle that would have to wait for another day. 

Back in front: last week’s winner El Tigre Blanco retakes the position

But there was still plenty to play for and clean and consistent driving meant that Copper Horse Racing was well placed at the halfway point. And, for the first time since the Barcelona race, could make its own call on when to take the mandatory pitstop rather than having the decision forced through mechanical damage. 

Everything connected… 

Watching the cars go around the circuit, it’s clear that Zolder has some interesting scenery – particularly the wind turbines. In previous posts, we’ve mentioned cyber security threats to vehicles, where the attack surface grows as developers add connectivity to their products. The same holds true for operational technology powering industrial systems such as electricity generators and water treatment plants. There are lots of benefits to being able to monitor components remotely such as improved maintenance scheduling, but the methods of protection have to adapt to the change as physical security alone is no longer sufficient to deter bad actors.  

Scenic view: some of the sights at Zolder

With everything becoming connected as part of the ‘Internet of Things’ (IoT) these days, attention is finally turning to the amount of legacy that exists within systems. Protocols in use often originate in the 1970s and have no ability for authentication or to provide integrity protection for the data going across them. Add to that the fact that the hardware and software has not been designed for security and rarely gets updated and you have all the jigsaw pieces for a security (and safety) nightmare.  

Industry and governments are in a race to improve cybersecurity in all the different ‘verticals’ whether it be automotive, industrial, or consumer IoT and there’ll have to be a lot of work to either replace or monitor the legacy insecure equipment and services that are left behind. 

McLaren versus Lamborghini: there were some great battles to watch as race 6 unfolded

Returning to the on-track action, Car 59 spent the final phase of the race behind Dutch driver Teis Hertgers, in a McLaren, trying to open up an over-taking opportunity. And with the pressure of the race-clock ticking, David Rogers made his move – at turn 1 where the Lamborghini was quicker. The move didn’t come off and David lost a little time; the battle now turning to the Ferrari 488 of Ulmer Gallium who loomed large in the Lamborghini’s mirrors. This time it was Gallium who over-pressured, making a pass before the first chicane, but overshooting into the sand, giving back the number 13 position to car 59. 

Before: dry conditions allowed drivers to push hard
After: a nice chance to take in the amazing livery on Ulmer Gallium’s Ferrari 488

With 60 minutes around Zolder complete, the series had a new race winner – P1 qualifier Mar Coolio of Finland. Scott Ullmann, who came third in the last race at Mount Panorama, went one better this week to take second. And Scott Cranston, who had placed well earlier in the season at Donington and in Barcelona, completed the podium in third. 

Race winner: Mar Coolio crosses the line in a McLaren 720S

Next up is Imola for the penultimate race of season 7. You can follow the action live on Tuesday the 22nd of June by tuning into Twitch from 19:30 hrs, UK time. See you then! 

About the author 

James Tyrrell is a threat modelling analyst at Copper Horse.